OK, here's the plan (if God is willing):

1) Every day will be a new devotional. I have enough devotionals for every day for three years

2) Also as I can, I'll be posting on my new political blog (see bottom of page).

Some other housecleaning:

A) If you'd like to just get new postings sent to your email, just submit your address in the box on the left just below. There's just one possible downside, though. Occasionally I'll add a music video at the end that's relevant to the devotional, and you won't get them in the email sent to you. If I add a video though, I'll make sure to mention in the posting, so you'll know to come to the site to see it if you'd like.

B) I actually finished writing new blog posting for the TAWG at the end of 2016. So what I'm doing now is at the beginning of every month, I'll move the earliest month from 3 years ago ahead so that a "new" posting appears every day. That's why you won't find any postings for January 2014, for example.

C) When I started this Blog, I was using the 1984 edition of the NIV, and that’s what I linked to on the Biblegateway site. However, in 2011 Zondervan updated its edition and thus reworded a lot of the NIV translation. Therefore, all the links which went to the 1984 edition now redirect to the 2011 edition, which often has slightly different wording. Thus, part of my editing process has been to update my Scripture quotes in my postings. But I might have missed some, in which case you might see my quote in the posting as a little different from what comes up when you click on my citation link, since that redirects to the 2011 edition on the Biblegateway site. It's a good thing that we realize that the work of translation never ends, but it can be a kind of a pain on a site like this. If you see any difference in verbiage between my quote and what shows up as a link on the Biblegateway site, or if you hover over a link and it has "NIV1984" at the end of it, please notify me and I'll correct it.

D) I can't believe I have to say this, but here goes. At the end of every posting is a suggested short prayer that has to do with what we discussed. This is actually what I've prayed when I finished writing it. In no way am I asking you to pray the exact verbiage of my suggested prayer. It's just a springboard for your own prayer, nothing more. Quite frankly, I've never been a fan of praying rote prayers written by someone else. As with everything else I do here, to the degree it helps, great; to the degree it doesn't, chunk it.

As always, thank you so much for reading, even if it's to read one post. God bless.

[Feb 11]--Study the Law, How?

Psalm 119:97-104

Ok, so you’ve convinced me that I need to actually read and study the Law of Moses, but how do I do it? You admitted that we don’t need to follow every part of the Law yesterday (like circumcision), so how do we apply it? I think we can find a clue in correcting our translation. The first five books of the Bible have many names: the books of Moses, the Pentateuch (“five books”) and the Torah. Torah has been translated as “Law,” and I think that can be a mistake. It can also be translated as “teaching,” and I think that’s a much better name for the first five books of the O.T. The best argument for this is the entire book of Genesis: Even though Genesis is in the first five books of the Bible, it’s mostly made up of narratives, not laws in the sense of rules and regulations. Since we still learn lessons from the narrative portions of Scripture, “teaching” seems a more appropriate name.

Why am I pointing this out? Because I submit that there's a use for God's word which you might not have considered before. If you've been a Christian for a while, you probably know to look for prophecies about Jesus and for foreshadows like the priesthood and sacrifices. You also probably know that one of the main purposes of the Law is to drive us to Christ by making us recognize God's standards and our need for a Savior.

But there's one aspect of the Torah which I think that believers tend to miss: One of the purposes of the Torah is to show us the heart of God: What he loves and hates, what’s important to him and what isn’t. As a corollary to this, the Torah is important to us as a guide to righteous living as modern believers this side of the cross.***

Now before you think I'm a Judaizer who wants to put us under the Law again, please hear me out.

Since the Torah is “teaching” instead of just rules, I think we can apply it best by distinguishing between principles and applications. Principles are timeless and eternal, and they don’t change any more than God does. Applications of these principles are almost always time-bound to some degree, especially as we change from the Old Covenant (or Old Testament) to the New Covenant in Christ.

For example, in Deut. 6:8-9 God told them to write down his word on their clothing and even “on the door frames of your houses and on your gates.” Have you ever noticed on a front door of a traditional Jewish house a symbol in Hebrew, which they kiss when they enter and leave? They're literally following this law. But for us as modern-day believers, are we disobeying God if we don't literally have Scripture printed on our door frame and our clothes? No. The principle is that we need to be reminded of his word every moment lest we forget and disobey it. We probably apply it differently than the ancient Hebrews and modern-day Jews. Maybe a good way to apply it is to have Bible verses printed on a 3X5 card and taped to my mirror. Or maybe I need to listen to audible readings of the Bible in my car.

This is how I study the Torah and apply it: 1) Prayerfully search out the principle behind the law or regulation. 2) Find a way to apply the principle behind the law in my personal setting. To get to the principle, ask questions such as, “What does this reveal about God’s value system?” “What does He care about, or not care about?” “How can I align my priorities with His?” "What change do I need to make in my life to apply this principle?" And of course, as always, the Holy Spirit is available to guide you into all truth.

If I want to love God, then shouldn’t I care about what he cares about?

Father, I want the same attitude as the Psalmist. How sweet are your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth! Make me a man after your own heart.

***I realize that this might seem a little controversial to some of my fellow believers who've been trained to look at an O.T. passage and only see how it directly relates to the person and work of Christ. If you have some trouble swallowing this, I think I've made a decent case for it, along with some further explication on it here and here.

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